Domain Recovery and Cybersquatting Litigation

The law is that which is boldly asserted and plausibly maintained.

M.L. Davis, Memoirs of Aaron Burr, attributing the saying to Burr.

Today it seems like a simple proposition, perhaps even an obvious truth: an Internet domain name must be the private property of the registrant.  But in 1999, when Charles Carreon’s client Gary Kremen sought to recover a precious domain name from the thief who had stolen it with a forged letter, it wasn’t so obvious.  In fact, all the legal precedents pointed to the opposite conclusion — a domain name was no different from a phone number.  Nevertheless, Carreon “boldly asserted and plausibly maintained” a position for which there was no existing support in the law, insisting that the law had to make common sense.  As a result, Gary Kremen became the first person to recover a stolen domain name by judicial act, and what a domain: Sex.Com, that Kremen sold a few years later for $14 Million.  They key to getting that result, says Carreon, was to remember the words of Solomon – a well-respected jurist in his own right:

What has been will be again. What has been done will be done again.  There is nothing new under the sun.

Ecclesiastes 1:9, New International Version.

Technological advances like the Internet don’t change what the law should be.  Human behavior doesn’t change. The urge to own property will likely always be with us, and the law must never reward theft.  Results speak for themselves, and the owners of premium domains know — Carreon’s expertise is world-class:

Without Charles Carreon, I would not have gotten the Sex.Com domain name back.  Without Charles Carreon, I would not have learned the law.  Without Charles Carreon, I would not have the success I have today.  I recommend him.

Gary Kremen, Feb 12, 2012

About eight years ago, my money-making domain name  got hijacked by a Korean hacker who hoodwinked my then-domain-registrar, Network Solutions. Luckily, Charles Carreon got a lawsuit going when a U.S. citizen got it off that Korean hacker. Charles successfully got my domain name back along with all the monies my domain name made while being hijacked. Excellent work! Oh yeah, later on when I wanted to release (sell) my domain name, Charles helped my navigate all the potential pitfalls involved in selling a prime domain name to a foreign entity. Charles Carreon, my hero!

Del Wong, Aug 2, 2012

Charles has a long and colorful history in domain name litigation. An expert with persistence and knowledge. A great guy to boot.

Richard Lau, owner of RL.Com.